KANISISKÁ

kasteddu randag city

Boias- KOfa - Rand-

Berlin Graffiti 2014

Rand- Kofa- Rife (Fmk)
Berlin  2014 Graffiti

redoxmagazine:

Redox for Galleria del Sale / Artist’s interview: ENEA
by Claudia Puddu
Photos by Beatrice Schivo and Claudio Valenti

-When did you start with this works and why?
I started in 1998, but I always loved drawing. It was all very instinctive, since I was familiar with the 90’s graffiti scene, when it was very related to hip-hop.

-Do you have some iconical characters that you prefer representing while painting?
I usually represent animals or animal-like characters. I am very interested in everything that has something to do with fauna.

-What is your ideal setting?
I prefer abandoned buildings, in order to better contextualize the painting, or I choose walls that are really visible.

-Can you tell us the difference between street art, graffiti and wall painting? Have you been influenced by some of these inclination?
Street art is more legitimized nowadays, and the artists realize their works wherever they want and without any permission, most of the time. The graffiti artist, on the other hand, disseminates his name, his personal tag, while street art’s purpose is not creating some kind of brand.

-You joined a collective group, EX-Q, located in the old police headquarters of Sassari. Do you think that illicit practices can sometimes help citizens to fill the hole in the cultural field?
This topic hits a raw nerve. Recently, as mutually agreed with the Province authorities, we decided to end the occupation. It is not, or better, it was not a subversive activity, since it would mean that we had a manifesto of revolutionary intents. We just wanted to provide for a need that had no other way to be fulfilled, when our society failed at it.

redoxmagazine:

Redox for Galleria del Sale / Artist’s interview: MANU INVISIBLE
by Claudia Puddu
Photos by Beatrice Schivo and Claudio Valenti

-When did you start with this works and why?
I started with graffiti, and I did my first doodle at eight. Now I am more into murales, with some differences. I don’t deal with any letter anymore, but I focus on characters.

-Do you have some iconical characters that you prefer representing while painting?
Faces, portraits.

-What is your ideal setting?
The 131 state highway: the walls are grey and I am surrounded by nature and calm.


-Can you tell us the difference between street art, graffiti and wall painting? Have you been influenced by some of these inclination?
The word “graffiti” is too generic; if you are talking about lettering, the right word is “writing”. Street art is illegal by nature, but at the same time respectful towards others and monuments. Muralism, on the other hand, is under commission.


-How do you use light painting, and does it work?
It is all based on portraiture; I start from doing little paintings that I later print on small format. My works are unique pieces that I realize with a personal method, using led.
Slork -  Boias 
 Berlin Graffiti 2014

redoxmagazine:

Redox for Galleria del Sale / Artist’s interview: LA FILLE BERTHA
by Claudia Puddu
Photos by Beatrice Schivo and Claudio Valenti

-When did you start with this works and why?
I started between 2008 and 2009, I can’t remember well. I’ve always drawn and I also had a lot of friends that do wall painting, so I started having fun with them. Then, I started a personal evolution.

-Do you have some iconical characters that you prefer representing while painting?
I always paint human or humanoid figures, they are part of my poetic and my research. I am expecially focused on female figures.

-What is your ideal setting?
I love to explore surfaces and interact with them, so having one is enough. Different spaces contributes to make different relations and, consequently, different emotions that origins from my interaction with the wall. It’s always important to contextualize it.

-Can you tell us the difference between street art, graffiti and wall painting? Have you been influenced by some of these inclinations?
The definition is “wall painting”. Legal or illegal, lettering or not. The definition is just “wall painting”.

-You are the only female artist of this weekend; do you think that gender is discriminating in this job?
Personally, I love to work with my female collegues, but I think that there are less female painters because less women want to paint. Since they’re less it’s necessary to support them, but above all we need to support talent, apart from gender.
BOias - Asetone- Rand     .  Berlin  Graffiti 2014

redoxmagazine:

Redox for Galleria del Sale / Artist’s interview: UFOE
by Claudia Puddu
Photos by Beatrice Schivo and Claudio Valenti

-When did you start with this works and why?
I started when I was 13, looking at graffiti and starting to experimenting myself.

-Do you have some iconical characters that you prefer representing while painting?
I don’t have any iconical subjects; I prefer lettering and everything that fits into the graffiti world, and I appreciate muralism too. My work is a never-ending experimentation based on my taste and ability.

-What is you ideal setting?
Anywhere there is a wall, even if it is easier to spray paint on surfaces like wood, iron etc.

-Can you tell us the difference between street art, graffiti and wall painting? Have you been influenced by some of these inclinations?
I am influenced the most by muralism and writing. Graffiti, or rather “letters”, are a difficult language to understand for everybody who is outside this world, and maybe that is one of the reasons why it is still unauthorized.

-Do you think that muralism is the last real popular art that can be reached by anybody, especially if you compare it with the elitary contemporary art?
I believe that muralism is the last frontier of the art world, but because of its evolving nature, after graffiti more things will come. About my purpose, I have been able to do what I wanted, in a space that it’s reachable by everyone.

redoxmagazine:

Redox for Galleria del Sale: Second week
reportage by Claudia Puddu
Photos by Beatrice Schivo and Claudio Valenti


The second and last weekend of events at the Galleria del Sale looks more demanding already; nine artists, several walls included in this venture, shocking heat and untraceable bicycles.
As I arrive at Ponte Vittorio in the late morning, I see from a distance Beatrice and Claudio, the two photographers of Redox, analyzing the place with the purpose of finding the best spots for shooting. While a one horse shay passes me by, I reach the desk of Urban Center, the organization in charge of the event, that includes its artistic director, DANIELE GREGORINI, as the artist that will realize his work by the cycling lane.
Some of the artists are already at their positions, with rolls and white paint in order to work on the background. I decide to wait an hour before asking for the interviews; I learned that the best moment is when they take out the tobacco and start rolling a cigarette.
The walls dedicated to MARCELLO MARINELLI, BILLYANDALEX, BOF, NEEVA and EISENAUER are one against the other, divided only by the road where now cars are passing by at high speed, honking, screaming through their windows, or just trying to take a look at the sketches.
I am observing the different artists around me: MARCELLO MARINELLI starts with a precise detail-oriented work, and BOF, followed by his assistant, Takeshi Kenzo (wearing a beautiful coverall with “your girlfriend is staring at me” written on it), is doing well with the preparatory drawing. This weekend there will be a guest from Berlin, too: BILLYANDALEX, ready to draw while the guys from Urban Center, climbing on little stairs, are keeping on removing old posters from the walls.
ENEA, from Sassari, is going to work in front of the stadium and while he is painting I get acquainted with his dog Nanà, a quiet diva looking for cuddles. A man on his forties joins us and shifts from one artist’s spot to another; his name is Giampiero, and he says that he used to steal but not anymore, and that he used to do drugs but not anymore.
Walking to SKAN’s position, I am pretty impressed by the vision of the three walls painted last week, whose presence could only improve the view of the zone. SKAN doesn’t release any interviews, but I keep staring at his work and the way he blends very precisely the colors for more than half an hour , and in the meanwhile I count the number of the spray bottles placed on the stair: nine.
In that moment on the Asse Mediano, a car stops and the driver shouts at the guys from Urban Center; he has bags full of cold drinks and ice with him.

My talk with ENEA begins, starting with his experience inside the collective EX-Q, then he says that street artist realizes his works wherever he feels like doing it and without any permission, most of the time.
A few moments later I am able to interview a very helpful BILLYANDALEX, who says that she doesn’t feel represented by any category, and that those labels so strict shouldn’t exist.
MARCELLO MARINELLI on the other hand, started as a writer, but he inherited from his mother the passion for painting.
Friday ends with my cameo as a wall cleaner: armed a with putty knife, I help the guys of the Urban Center to remove old posters. While I am at it, I mentally curse everyone that complains about graffiti, street art, murales or whatever the hell they want to call it, when they don’t say a word about illicit ads that, I or even better the organizers can assure you, are damn hard to take off.
When I come back, Saturday afternoon, not only the walls are perfectly clean, but NEEVA and EISENAUER are at work, BOF has already finished and goes away after an informal chat, and MANU INVISIBILE is painting too. I approach his wall, looking at the area below from a bridge; in spite of the rush of getting the hundreds of things to do that stressed me out, the view forced me to stop there for several minutes. I find myself staring at something strikingly beautiful and indefinable around that insalubrious canal and the stadium that stands out, in those many bridges, in the Arena Grandi Eventi where Caparezza is going to sing in the evening. When the moment of decadent beauty fades away, I am near MANU INVISIBILE who shows me his sketch, amazing me with the vision needed in order to to realize the whole thing. He also tells me how often people try to found out his identity and his gender. According to his vision, the word “graffiti” is incorrect, as “writing” would be more accurate, and street art can be defined as an illegal activity, which does not leave out a certain sense of respect for the others and for the monument itself. We keep talking, and a man who is passing by for an afternootaken run starts insulting us, yelling to get out of his way (I’m sweetening this), even if he had to invade the whole work area to do so. Despite this little provocation, the event goes on peacefully and in a jovial mood, eating fruits and speaking about light painting. 
There is a lot of curiosity around us from the people happening to be nearby; they stop to see the drawings, make comments guessing what works is yet to complete or not, and there are critics too, that compare the works of the event with Banksy’s. The Urban Center’s desk is near the stop of the bus number 3, and the drivers often slow down to take a look around.
During the last interview, NEEVA and EISENAUER take turn to answer my questions: EISENAUER generally focuses more on the interaction with the surface she is working on, while NEEVA doesn’t hesitate when he recalls his beginnings as a writer, adding that he was not very skilled at making tags, and that he later shifted to muralism, which is very popular in Sardinia’s towns. What makes street art, in his opinion, is the adrenaline induced by its illegal side. Making this practice legal, would change the nature of the street art itself. 

This weekend is over, everything is getting back in order, and in the light of this experience I could only feel enriched.
Now I can be sure I know more about the graffiti world, which are very influenced by hip-hop and are based, substantially, on the creation of a tag and his reproducibility.
Another thing that I know now, is how most of the artists that were here on this event came from the graffiti world, but felt the need to evolve and change into something more complex and mature. All those three field, however, are interconnected, and it is not rare that one single work is often labeled as “street art”, or as “murales” with a strong lettering component. What they share is the desire of showing their art in an unconventional way, in order to be free to express themselves without being disrespectful and having the authorizations that can turn their passion into a real job.
Whoever defines this a mere vandalism should stop, think, and try to understand more this part of citizens that loves not only tagging around the city, but using this form of expression to start an artistic and personal evolution, learning by themselves how to requalify the urban space, covering all the grey that takes over the cities, and bringing their art in front of everyone’s eyes .
While I am walking for the last time on the cycling line, I feel very blessed because I had the chance to see, during day time, people that usually work at night. And I didn’t just see them, but I talked to them, I interviewed them, and I got to know their vision of the world they live in, filling a gap I had about this subject. Observing with the eyes of someone willing to understand, is the only way to go beyond first impressions, and I hope that as many people as possible will do that, thanks to Galleria del Sale. Whoever thinks that these are just vandals, should see the respect that they have in approaching a wall, while they analyze it, color it and then look at it from a distance, almost with a tender gaze.

They call it street art, they call it graffiti, they call it wall painting; but at the core of all I think there is only freedom, nothing more.

Report of Galleria del Sale second week! Thank you to RedoxMagazine, that’s all awesome!

redoxmagazine:

Redox for Galleria del Sale / Artist’s interview: CONAN
by Claudia Puddu
Photos by Beatrice Schivo and Claudio Valenti

-When did you start with this works and why?
I started fifteen years ago, looking at the graffiti all over the walls of Cagliari and trying to understand their meaning. Then I tried to do the same. But you know, I am still trying to figure out the meaning of everything that I see painted on a wall. I am in a continuous work in progress. 



-Do you have some iconical characters that you prefer representing while painting?
I write. Since the very beginning I have painted for my own pleasure and during my studies, but I really do love write. I do calligraphy and graphics in every way e with all kind of instruments. 



-What is you ideal setting?
I am versatile. As I do love using all kind of instrument to write, I do love write on every surface. It also depends on the situation; for example, if I am writing in the street I have different modalities resulting from the fact that I have to concentrate my work in a little time lapse. 



-Can you tell us the difference between street art, graffiti and wall painting? Have you been influenced by some of these inclinations?
I’m really fond of the basics, so let’s start with the murales: they originate from the mexican culture, which commonly re-elaborates folk themes and represents traditional situations. Graffiti, on the other hand, are naturally born clandestine, as a protest act invading the public space. Street art is a new form of muralism, and the only one that can be three-dimensional and two-dimensional both. I said before that graffiti are an unwanted discipline, the opposite of street art, which we can find in the urban space as the form of allowed projects re-qualifying the territory. It is about various arts, including graffiti and pop, and then minimalism.

-What do you want to answer to those that are still disapproving street art and call into question its value?
I would tell them that art is both free and freeing, and that we cannot define as art only the one we find inside a frame. This kind of art invades the urban space, but my impression is that sometimes the attention is diverted from what the real problems are. Let me explain: the problem is not a painted wall, the problem is a wall that is falling into pieces, just like the problem is not a painted train, but the train coming late. Disapproving the painting, is often just a way to change the subject matter. This is a form of art that insists on personal emancipation, making art against everyone.

redoxmagazine:

Redox for Galleria del Sale: First week
reportage by Claudia Puddu
Photos by Beatrice Schivo and Claudio Valenti


They call it street art, they call it graffiti, they call it wall painting; I’m walking through the small port of Su Siccu with my notebook, eager to know more about it, and I find, at the bottom left, a little street leading to the cycling lane. The Salt Road makes you feel, for a few minutes, like being in New Mexico: a narrow orange street, tiny walksides, wild bushes and that kind of silence that isolates you, with no need of wearing your headphones because of the noise. Such a nice place, the Salt Road. Fast cyclists are passing by my left, well disciplined while wearing their helmets and their high visibility vests; following them led me to what is going to be, during these two weeks, an open air gallery. The flyover walls, dominating the cycling lane that connect the port of Su Siccu to Viale La Palma, will be canvas. They call it street art, they call it graffiti, they call it wall painting: but I think that, after getting rid of all the sciolism and the proper distinctions, calling it “artwork”, which is generic but maybe more comprehensive, is fairer for those artists that refuse to be stucked inside one definition. At my arrival under the first flyover, the one dedicated to the works of UFOE and LA FILLE BERTHA, a calm mood, dense with preparatory work, reigns over. The main characters of this weekend are not arrived yet, but the place is already crowded with the co-stars of the event; first, the guys from Urban Center, carrying on their shoulders the burden of the unexpected things that occur in every event, then the journalists from the most popular sardinian press agencies, and last, myself and the two photographers that are with me, Beatrice e Claudio. After an initial inspection of the whole area, I start to take a deeper look around. The chromatic impact coming back at me is pretty depressing; the canal, outlined by bushes and weed, wears an unpleasant shade of green, the walls have still attached the signs of ten and more years old posters of Moira Orfei, while the ones that have been cleaned are now showing various grey nuances. I say to myself that a touch of color would not do any harm to a place like that, and I slowly start to rethink about the presence of that canal and the wild nature surrounding the walls, wondering how the artists will use the location to contextualize their works.

The main theme was given by the organizers, and it is nature indeed. That nature often used as the main subject by artists like CRISA and TELLAS, working under Ponte Vittorio. Beyond the canal, the Sant’Elia Stadium is a sight that stands out, and the artist ZED1, from Florence, is going to work right in front of it. The first day is characterized awaiting the artists. Preparations are, in fact, long. The guys from Urban Center are bringing paint and brushes from a bridge to the other within the cycling lane, trying to avoid collisions with the cyclists that, intrigued, stop in front of the organizers desk, asking me for information, wondering what is happening and what is the meaning beyond the stripes around the walls. They answer with smiles and nods to my explanations, and promise to come back in the afternoon. A fulfilled promise, especially by a family that not only waited with their children for the artists to arrive, but kept running through the cycling lane to inform everyone passing by of the starting event. The artists, one by one, begin to set their place up. ZED1 arrives, stares at the wall from side to side, asks for rod and stairs and immediately begins to work. I blame myself for not renting a bicycle while I am walking for more than an half-hour to join him, then we sit on the sidewalk in front of the stadium and talk about the first strokes of his work, trying to guess what the final result will be. He releases me the first interview of the event, explaining -and almost showing some kind of affection- the illegal side of street art, namely, the writers world, because if it is now possible to have approved agreements on wall paintings, the credit goes to to who made this practice legal when it was absolutely not. While I’m listening to this bearded man who has been working around the world for more than twenty years, a smile comes upon my face when I see the guys of Urban Center borrowing bicycles to move faster from random people passing by. I take a short note on my journal “paint bucket inside the wicker basket of a Graziella”, and I don’t know why, but I find this picture really poetic; maybe the reason is that it is good to see how the efforts of so many young people, spending time to improve their city, are repaid even by a simple gesture like borrowing a bicycle. I spend most of my afternoon watching UFOE, TELLAS, CRISA and LA FILLE BERTHA preparing the wall for the paint. The white paint flows covering what is below, both the impersonal grey of the wall itself and the previous drawings. I am going back and forth to the beginning of the cycling and Ponte Vittorio, and I suddenly bump into CONAN’s wall and, mostly, I bump into his balaclava. I sit near him on a sidewalk in front of the wall, facing the Asse Mediano. A pretty uncomfortable position, near the road, with little chance to see the whole work from a distance. He is rolling a cigarette while I am interviewing him, his balaclava always on, and I am trying to know more about the graffiti and the murales (or wall painting) community; he explains me how murales originates from the popular tradition of Mexico, how street art can also be three-dimensional (just think about those series made through the walls) and how it can have pop and minimalism influences both, while on the other hand graffiti are more a self-referential and egocentric manifestation. We are spacing from the most accurate notions to the definition of the expression “telarsi”, so typical of Cagliari, when CRISA joins us, riding another borrowed bicycle and looking for brushes.

It’s Saturday afternoon and the dark stain of paint by CRISA is starting to get populated by details, according to his poetics, that depicts Nature invading and almost overcoming metropolises, and his drawing crosses the different shades of blu of TELLAS’. Those two, as CRISA says, often work together and their drawings invade each other’ space. We talk about his projects, not only those in Sardinia, but overseas as well, and I keep looking for differences between graffiti and wall painting, as CRISA defines it. He explains that spray graffiti are one thing, wall painting is a total different one, and street art is, more generically, everything that interacts with the street, from performance to installation. CONAN teaches me his typical greeting, which we use every time I pass by his wall, when my personal acknowledgment finally comes: a stranger in his sixties stops right in front of me, and asks me if I am a writers. Yes, that’s exactly what he said, “writers”. Smiling, I show them the real writers and he runs after them. This street art event is organized by the Urban Center Cagliari association, inside the project “Iniziative di creatività urbana – Inter20”, financed by the Presidency of the Council of Ministers. This means that they have all the municipality permissions, of course, but when the police stopped near the stadium and approached ZED1, I must admit my prejudice: I was sure they wanted to do another inspection and I immediately complained about their ignorance, but suddenly we heard screaming, from the other side of the canal: “Congratulations for your works, they are beautiful!”, and we saw them sitting and chatting with the artists. Meanwhile, the Sconvolts from Cagliari, waiting for their Italy Cup match, are all getting in line to take a piss on the walls. Oh, if only I had a camera with me, or one of Redox’s photographers close by. I’m interviewing LA FILLE BERTHA and UFOE while they are busy finishing their works with their tags; LA FILLE BERTHA is very clear about the distinction of murales, graffiti and street art. She just calls it wall painting, whether it is legal or not, lettering or something else. Just wall painting. UFOE explains that his work in mainly based on murales and writing. These five artists gave me very different opinions about what is the meaning of painting on a wall, and it is pretty obvious how they are represented by styles and worlds that are totally different. But I can still find in each one of them the same desire to express their art as a personal emancipation, interacting and creating a real dialogue with the medium they are working on.

It’s Sunday and the last works are finished, the last details are taken care of, the paint and the brushes put aside, the construction yard dismantled. My personal research on the graffiti world, the murales and the street art, will go on and will wait until next monday’s reportage to know my very personal opinion (and the artists’ personal opinion, since I made an explicit question in my interviews for them to explain as better as they could what they do and why they do it), but I can close this first article on an emotional note: walking over, under and by the Galleria del Sale, has been a strong brainstorming of memories and feelings. All the artists here have been drawing and painting for more than ten years and are presenting some mature works that reflect their human and artistic evolution. Nevertheless, while I was looking at the works of the artists from Cagliari, I was able to recognize something, a little detail, a clear stroke, that remembered me of that wall near my highschool, or the route of my morning bus, when I was observing the city with my sleepy face, and I was unconsciously taking mental pictures that reappeared thanks to the details found on these Sunday paintings, or thanks to the friendly talk with every artist. The moment was cathartic: Cagliari is beautiful, in every wall.

Many thanks to the girls and boys of Redox Magazine! What a good reportage! That’s what is happened in Cagliari 2 WE ago, on the Galleria del Sale, the first contemporany murales gallery for this city! Enjoy!

Kofa. Magdeburg.
Kofa - RandA
 Berlin Graffti   014

Berlin Traffic MIx  # 1 

RaND- Berlin Graffiti  2014